Legislation

Bill to conserve half of all Vermont land vetoed

by Guy Page

Gov. Phil Scott on June 2 vetoed H606, a United Nations-inspired bill to conserve from development 50% of Vermont’s total land area by 2050.

It was Scott’s 14th veto of 2021-2022 biennium legislation. Unless the Legislature reconvenes for a veto session – which is considered unlikely – it will be the 10th veto to take effect.

The bill, sponsored by House Natural Resources Chair Amy Sheldon (D-Middlebury), cites United Nations-sourced information that a million plant and animal species are threatened with extinction, humans globally are are squeezing wildlife into ever smaller areas, and that changes in land and sea use are the #1 driver of these problems.

Scott said he supports conservation but the bill’s measures are too permanent and restrictive, he explained in his veto letter to the Legislature. 

“The conservation goals established in H.606 are unnecessarily tied to – and unreasonably limited to – permanent protection,” Scott said. “The Agency has repeatedly said that permanent preservation has not been, and cannot be, the state’s exclusive conservation tool.”

H606 is at least the second major land use bill to be vetoed this session. On June 1, Gov. Scott vetoed S234, the Act 250 reform bill.

On June 2, Gov. Scott also these bills into law: 

  • H74, making miscellaneous changes concerning self-storage businesses
  • H244, authorizing the natural organic reduction of human remains
  • H446, miscellaneous natural resources and development subjects
  • H512, modernizing land records and notarial acts law
  • H518, municipal energy resilience initiatives
  • H572, the retirement allowance for interim educators
  • H709, miscellaneous agricultural subjects
  • H716, making miscellaneous changes in education law.

Bill to conserve half of all Vermont land vetoed

by Guy Page

Gov. Phil Scott on June 2 vetoed H606, a United Nations-inspired bill to conserve against development 50% of Vermont’s total land area by 2050.

It was Scott’s 14th veto of 2021-2022 biennium legislation. Unless the Legislature reconvenes for a veto session – which is considered unlikely – it will be the 10th veto to take effect.

The bill, sponsored by House Natural Resources Chair Amy Sheldon (D-Middlebury), cites United Nations-sourced information that a million plant and animal species are threatened with extinction, humans globally are are squeezing wildlife into ever smaller areas, and that changes in land and sea use are the #1 driver of these problems.

Scott said he supports conservation but the bill’s measures are too permanent and restrictive, he explained in his veto letter to the Legislature. 

“The conservation goals established in H.606 are unnecessarily tied to – and unreasonably limited to – permanent protection,” Scott said. “The Agency has repeatedly said that permanent preservation has not been, and cannot be, the state’s exclusive conservation tool.”

H606 is at least the second major land use bill to be vetoed this session. On June 1, Gov. Scott vetoed S234, the Act 250 reform bill.

On June 2, Gov. Scott also these bills into law: 

  • H74, making miscellaneous changes concerning self-storage businesses
  • H244, authorizing the natural organic reduction of human remains
  • H446, miscellaneous natural resources and development subjects
  • H512, modernizing land records and notarial acts law
  • H518, municipal energy resilience initiatives
  • H572, the retirement allowance for interim educators
  • H709, miscellaneous agricultural subjects
  • H716, making miscellaneous changes in education law.

Categories: Legislation

5 replies »

  1. “United Nations inspired” translation – a demonic entity ensuring 90% of Earth’s population will never prosper, guaranteed endless suffering, and depopulation.

  2. Melissa Casey, you are spot-on. Anything UN has no business in this state, or even in this country! They are all globalists and I’m so tired of their crap.

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