Legislation

2022 session overview: big spending, lots of retirements

Republished from the succinct, highly readable Lake Champlain Chamber advocacy newsletter. Click here for more details about specific legislation.

The Legislature adjourned Thursday, May 12 in the early evening, concluding the 2022 session and the 2021-2022 biennium. The House did not set a veto session, so it will be up to the Governor to call the legislature back if a veto necessitates one. It was a very consequential session with a legacy of “a great reshuffling.” 

Retirements 

  • More than one-third of the Senate (12 confirmed) is retiring, a previously unseen level of departures in that body which will mean a large loss of institutional knowledge. More than half of the chairs in the House, with the running total at nine, are retiring among the over 40 members of the House moving on. Outside the legislature, there are equally consequential vacancies in the positions of Lt. Governor, Secretary of State, and Treasurer. There will also be a new Senate Pro Tem next session. 

Large budget 

  • At $8.3 billion, we just witnessed the largest budget in state history as it allocates what is left of the federal COVID relief dollars from the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA).  

All the federal dollars

  • All the federal money is gone, more isn’t coming, and if it was, could we land the small state minimums that Senator Patrick Leahy was notorious for bringing home?

Vetoes 

  • The Governor brandished the veto pen throughout the session and delivered some high-profile vetos. In total, there have been 26 from him since he became Governor; however, it has not had the impact on his popularity the Democrats expected, and seems to have only propelled him. 

Redistricting 

As folks leave the legislature, some headed out for reelection and some for a new, higher office, many will be campaigning in new districts. 

Categories: Legislation

4 replies »

  1. So many “leaders” are fleeing? Why? Because the congress is over-run by freakish extremists and if republicans truly do land an election windfall (providing they’re not all RINO’s) – there may be some investigations on the horizon. .

  2. I can’t imagine why so many career, “progreSSive” politicians would want to leave at the peak of their power. They have finally achieved Bernie’s socialist utopia. Why not stick around to bask in the glory of record crime rates, a failed education system, a collapsed health care system, a raging heroin/fentanyl epidemic, no housing, a staggering labor shortage and hyperinflation. What’s not to enjoy?

  3. A State with roughly 645,000 has a budget of $8.3 billion. Makes sense doesn’t it? The grifters and the bureaucrats have lined their pockets with glee. Those stepping down are taking the money and running – likely to Florida. A cesspool of corruption and taxpayers funding it all. Vermont is insolvent. Be prepared or get out asap.

  4. This is the opportunity for Vermont to restore some sanity and balance to our Golden dome. Good solid common sense people need to step up to the plate and run for office. Let there be disagreement in how and what to fund but let there be balance instead of a lopsided bunch of group think clones. Vermont is a most desirable place (or at least was) to live, let’s all come together and restore it to the hardworking independent thinking place it’s remembered for. We need people who can look through the spending habits and make sure we are first and foremost meeting the needs of safety and security for its citizens. Then we can address the rest of the budget. Get the special interest people out of the way and do the hard work of restoring sanity to our tiny, easily manageable sized state.

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