Crime

Another suspected heroin dealer ‘cited to appear’ in court

by Guy Page

For at least the second time in three months, a suspected Vermont heroin dealer has been arrested after a lengthy, multi-jurisdictional police investigation. But, instead of being sent to jail pending a court appearance, the suspected dealer has been given a written citation to appear in court more than two months from the date of arrest.

On July 1, in Grand Isle, the Vermont Drug Task Force, Franklin County Sheriff’s Department, Grand Isle Sheriff’s Department, South Burlington Police Department, Homeland Security Investigations, and the Drug Enforcement Administration conducted a search warrant at the residence of and arrested Michael Larrow, 63, of Grand Isle on suspicion of sale of heroin and fentanyl trafficking.

The arrest of Larrow was the conclusion of a Vermont Drug Task Force investigation that began in October 2020 in cooperation with the Franklin County Sheriff’s Department, Grand Isle Sheriff’s Department, South Burlington Police Department, Homeland Security Investigations, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Grand Isle County State’s Attorney’s Office. The investigation revealed that on multiple occasions Larrow sold heroin.

Larrow was issued a citation to appear in the Criminal Division of the Vermont Superior Court in North Hero on 09/16/2021 at 08:30AM to answer to the aforementioned charges.

At least Larrow wasn’t on supervised release from prison when he allegedly dealt drugs and then was cited to appear in court. – unlike Warren Poole of Enosburg.

On April 27, in Enosburg, the Vermont Drug Task Force, Franklin County Sheriff’s Department, and Homeland Security Investigations arrested Poole, 41, on suspicion of sale of methamphetamine and sale of heroin, state police say.

The arrest of Poole also was the conclusion of a Vermont Drug Task Force investigation, which began in July 2020 in cooperation with the Franklin County Sheriff’s Department and South Burlington Police Department. The investigation revealed that Poole sold methamphetamine and heroin. At the time of the investigation and at the time of his arrest, Poole was under supervision by the Vermont Department of Corrections as a parolee.

Poole was issued a citation to appear in the Criminal Division of the Vermont Superior Court in Saint Albans on July 27.

At a press conference following the Poole arrest, Public Safety Commissioner Michael Schirling said legislation and policies have reduced law enforcement options for holding suspects in jail. A ‘bail reform’ law in New York State is being blamed by prosecutors there for an increase in opioid abuse, as users and dealers if arrested are merely returned to the streets. Similar legislation is under consideration in Vermont.

Categories: Crime

8 replies »

  1. And according to my school district, one of the greatest threats to Vermont’s children is white supremacists.

  2. The liberalized “justice” system in this country has become a force feed revolving door, where offenders are injected in, and spit out like projectile diarrhea as fast as possible. It’s kind of like if the health department was continually releasing new strains of covid out into the public, and they knew it would kill more people, but they just don’t care. I guess that as long as you are allowing over a hundred thousand illegal aliens a month into the country, you don’t have to worry about replace units. Reminds me of the joke, “oh young man, so spic and span, where were you, when the —- hit the fan ? And it will hit the fan !

  3. Our society is in ruins. All that is good is now bad, and vice-versa. Like some I’m sure – I saw this coming decades ago down in NYC & its once post-WW2 idyllic suburbs. The unfettered illegal immigrants teeming in along with rapidly rising crime, drugs, and urban squalor. Vermonters seemed to think that would never happen here, but it can and it is – wreaking destruction & death (yes, death, Opioids anyone?) in its path as the leaders charge the average hard-working lawful citizens with its cause and perpetually continue to protect the criminals from us. Twisted, sad, and of course eventually fatal – one way or the other.

  4. We’re way too tough on drug dealers. We should join hands and sing Kumbaya at The Unitarian Church and protest police brutality because these two fellows are just misunderstood.

  5. How is it that trafficking in heroin, fentanyl, and meth are not viewed as a direct danger to the community by these judges? Hey Governor Scott, the “best science” shows that the opioid crisis is one of the gravest dangers facing Vermont . . . what are you going to do about it?

    • This is all true! Trafficking in these drugs is a threat to every community in Vermont. The end result is that it is a tremendous expense to the taxpayers not to mention dangerous to the personal safety of innocent citizens who are victims of the drug users and especially those who sell or supply those illegal products. Giving these dealers the equivalent of a traffic ticket is just a “get out of jail free card” puts them right back on the streets.

  6. Who are the government officials and judges being paid off by the drug cartels? Anyone know? Anyone looking into it?

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