Covid-19

Judge rules against mask-free Newport store

Newport mask-free store owner Mike Desautels, left chats with supporter. Photo credit Newport Dispatch

NEWPORT – Orleans Superior Court Judge Mary Miles Teachout Friday ruled for the state on the final merits of its enforcement action against HNR Desautels LLC, currently doing business as Derby Port Press, and its owner, Andre “Michael” Desautels.

Judge Teachout ordered the defendants to stop violating Governor Scott’s Executive Order and Addenda.

“Specifically, Defendants shall not employ any persons or open any premises for business without compliance with EO 01-20 and its addenda and ACCD’s Phased Restart Work Safe Guidance,” ordered Judge Teachout in today’s decision.

In February, Attorney General T.J. Donovan filed a civil lawsuit and motion for a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction to stop the Newport business from violating Governor Scott’s Executive Order and Addenda.

In its complaint, the State alleged that the Defendants were in violation of Governor Scott’s orders by working in the presence of others without wearing required cloth face coverings.

Compliance checks conducted by the Newport Police Department showed the defendants, who formerly did business as the UPS Store, continued to violate the Governor’s orders even after the complaint was filed.

On February 23, 2021, Orleans Superior Court granted the State’s motion for a temporary restraining order, requiring Desautels to comply with the Governor’s mask mandate to operate the business.

In today’s ruling, Judge Teachout wrote, “The facts are clear that both the business entity, HNR Desautels LLC, and Mr. Desautels personally were in violation of the ACCD rules on February 18 and 22, 2021, and on other days in which the store was open for business and he was not wearing a face-covering over his nose and mouth when in the presence of others.”

Today’s decision compels the business and its owner to comply with the Governor’s orders.

The Court rejected the legal arguments presented by Desautels and his attorney and found that the Emergency Management statute is constitutional.

A remote status conference has been scheduled by Orleans Superior Court, Civil Division, for April 22, 2021 to address the State’s request for civil penalties.

Republished with permission from the March 12 Newport Dispatch.

Categories: Covid-19

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5 replies »

  1. Dear peasants, despite scientific evidence proving masking up’s effectiveness in doubt, you will comply with our unconstitutional mandates or we will crush you with the force of government.

    Now pay your taxes, step in line, and keep quiet.

    And I thought Vermont’s motto was “Freedom and Unity.” Silly me!

  2. Constitutional she says – now isn’t that interesting. The list is longer than one to be put out of business – it’s a system needing to be….

  3. Vermont has been in the dark since day 1, with making up it’s own floundering science to follow in this Plandemic, and completely ignoring the real science, which is so obvious to those of us who ignore the lies being told by the corrupt media and see all the planned confusion to try to keep the uninformed in the dark to lead them like sheep. I wish all those who stand for the freedoms that are being taken away from us, the best, and please know that soon it will be over.

  4. For those of you who have been abused by our corrupt government, please visit the National Action Task Force (NATF). They use “Commom Law” instead of Maritime Law, that is used illegally in today’s society.
    They are becoming a force to be reckoned with in the court room.
    Governor Scott can not make laws, since only the Vt Legislature can. Mandates are only suggestions.

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